• Brad Keating

Is it Illegal to go to Helltown Ohio?

Updated: Aug 5

Whenever people are looking for creepy places to visit in Ohio, there is a good chance that Helltown is going to come up. There are, indeed, very few places that contain as many myths and scary stories all focused on one area as Helltown does. As far as it being forbidden to visit, technically, the answer is no. Helltown and Boston Township are mostly within the confines of Cuyahoga Valley National Park in northern Ohio. This means that they are free to visit. Interestingly enough, part of the reason why people abandoned the place has to do with the creation of the national park!



What is the Real Story Behind Helltown Ohio?

There are, in essence, a lot of stories surrounding Helltown. Before we get to some of the myths and legends of the place, it may be a good idea to explore the real story. Helltown is a nickname given to a part of Boston Township. We are talking about a rural area that is named Boston, Ohio, not Massachusetts. In the 1970s, the people who lived in the area were displaced from the land by the United States government. The National Park Service obtained the liberty to "buy land" and turn that land into national parks. In rural areas, many people who were living on the property ended up kicked out of their homes without proper compensation, because they did not properly own the land. In a nutshell, though, that's why Boston OH, became a ghost town.

Myths Surrounding Helltown Ohio

Since the people were, in fact, displaced from their land, this left a lot of empty homes. Apparently, there was a suicide that occurred in one of these homes in 2004. The tragedy only grew the folklore status of the place. Urban legends dictate that there is a satanic church on the outskirts near Boston Mills, an area near Helltown. Potentially, all sorts of dark rituals take place here. There is also a road that is called the "End of the World Road." This road is actually officially named Stanford Road, but it's a road that is pretty unsafe; visitors are going to want to be careful on it if they are planning on visiting. The Boston Cemetery and even a slaughterhouse and an abandoned school bus all have their unique stories to explore, here, too.

Can People Go to Helltown, Ohio?

People can visit this place in Ohio; Boston Township, which is Helltown! Some people still live outside of the designated national park area, too. Visiting this area is completely free. It's only a little over 20 miles outside of the Cleveland area, which also makes it convenient. If people are planning to visit, they are going to have the opportunity to take a day trip there without needing to book a night at a creepy hotel nearby. They could easily drive back to the Cleveland area without too much trouble.

Things to Know Before Visiting

Helltown is, undoubtedly, one of the most famous "haunted towns" in the world. Once again, it's free to visit, but there are a couple of things that people should know so they don't get into any trouble. Visitors must make sure they are staying within the limits of the national park area while exploring. If they wander onto private property, they could be in trouble. Also, there are places in and around the town that are not overly safe. Even if they don't come into contact with any ghosts directly, there is a chance that visitors could come into contact with people doing things like practicing satanic rituals. Needless to say, sometimes these people may not be all too friendly. Staying within the park limits and visiting at regular hours are two things that can keep people out of trouble!





For more information on Ohio's criminal laws and statutes, visit our criminal laws blog.

Visit our next blog to discover if dumpster diving is illegal in Ohio.





Disclaimer: The details included in this blog is offered for educational purposes only, and should not be taken as lawful guidance in any way. No recipients of material from this blog, clients or otherwise, should or should not act on the basis of any material consisted in the blog without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional guidance on the particular facts and situations at issue from an attorney accredited in the recipient's state.


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